Category: Dharmic Education

Reflections on the Thirty Third Paurī from JapJī Sāhib by Gurū Nānak

I love this 33rd Paurī from Gurū Nānak’s Jap Jī and use it regularly as a stopgap for many situations. God is the Doer and provider of all (not you or Prince Charming). You can repeat this Paurī  to neutralize the destructive nature of the ego, to be free from self-vengeance, from being too critical, to clear the
33rd Pauree

Protocols for Handling a Multi-Volume Siri Guru Granth Sahib

The Siri Guru Granth Sahib is usually embodied in a large, all Gurmukhi single volume. This is referred to as a “Bir”, meaning something that is fastened together. Today, with the world-wide demand to have access to understanding the meaning of the words of the Siri Guru Granth Sahib, there are many copies
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Journey into the Heart of Sikh Dharma (2019)

These days we are so busy, constantly bombarded with information, opportunities, responsibilities, and distractions. There seems to be an urgent need to slow down, breathe, and learn in a new way that seeps into your consciousness and your life — so you experience a deep satisfaction in your soul. Taking time for mindful
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Reflections on the Twenty Eighth Paurī from JapJī Sāhib by Gurū Nānak

This Pauri from Jap Jī is very important. Mundā santokh, tolerance and unlimited patience, is the highest power you can have. Mundā are the earrings, which yogīs wear in the solar center to denounce the world. It is the sun meridian point: this little lobe represents your head with the central part of your intelligence in the center. When
28th Pauree

The Nine Treasures

The Guru refers to meditation on God's Name and meditating on the source of our existence as being the gift that keeps on giving.  All, spiritual, worldly and aesthetic pleasures imaginable - nine and beyond - are obtained and derived from deeply experiencing the One within our own selves.
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Reflections on the Twenty Fourth Paurī from JapJī Sāhib by Gurū Nānak

The 24th Paurī uses the term Ant Na, repeatedly. Ant means end. Na is the negation of Ant,  meaning without end, countless, as it is frequently translated. In this Paurī, Gurū Nānak marvels at the vastness of the Ek Ong Kār. He explains that countless are the praises and the praisers of God, countless are the works and gifts of God. Gurū Nānak goes
24th Pauree

Reflections on the Twenty Third Paurī from JapJī Sāhib by Gurū Nānak

The faithful praise God over and over again, reciting mantras, prayers, and hymns. We try to understand God by better understanding Gurbāṉī, through meditation, devotional service, and reflection. All who sing of the Wonderful One, who describe God in so many countless ways – with all the devotion that fills their hearts – how great
23rd Pauree